Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility
New Evacuations Ordered Because of Florence Flooding
gvw_ap_news
By Associated Press
Published 6 years ago on
September 21, 2018

Share

WILMINGTON, N.C. — A new round of evacuations was ordered in South Carolina as the trillions of gallons of water dumped by Hurricane Florence meanders to the sea, raising river levels and threatening more destruction.

“I’m so sad just thinking about all the work we put in. My gut is turning up. We put a lot of heart and soul into putting it back up.” — Dennis DeLong, church member
With the crisis slowly moving to South Carolina, emergency managers on Friday ordered about 500 people to flee homes along the Lynches River. The National Weather Service said the river could reach record flood levels late Saturday or early Sunday, and shelters are open.
Officials downstream sounded dire alarms, pointing out the property destruction and environmental disasters left in Florence’s wake.
“We’re at the end of the line of all waters to come down,” said Georgetown County Administrator Sel Hemingway, as he warned the area may see a flood like it has never seen before.
In North Carolina, a familiar story was unfolding as many places that flooded in Hurricane Matthew in 2016 were once again inundated.
Two years ago, flooding ruined the baseboards and carpet of the Presbyterian Church of the Covenant in Spring Lake. The congregation rebuilt, This year, water from the Little River water broke the windows, leaving the pews a jumbled mess and soaked Bibles and hymn books on the floor.
“I’m so sad just thinking about all the work we put in. My gut is turning up,” church member Dennis DeLong said. “We put a lot of heart and soul into putting it back up.”

Flood Damage Estimated at $1.2 Billion

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster estimated damage from the flood in his state at $1.2 billion in a letter that says the flooding will be the worst disaster in the state’s modern history. McMaster asked Congressional leaders to hurry federal aid.
North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said he knows the damage in his state will add up to billions of dollars, but said with the effects on the storm ongoing, there was no way to make a more accurate estimate.
Meanwhile, the National Hurricane Center said it was monitoring four areas in the Atlantic for signs of a new tropical weather threat. One was off the coast of the Carolinas with a chance of drifting toward the coast.
About 55,000 homes and businesses remain without power after Florence, nearly all in North Carolina, and down from a high of more than 900,000 in three states.
Florence is blamed for at least 42 deaths in the Carolinas and Virginia, including that of an 81-year-old whose body was found in a submerged pickup truck in South Carolina. Well over half the dead were killed were in vehicles.
Potential environmental problems remained. Duke Energy issued a high-level emergency alert after floodwaters from the Cape Fear River overtopped an earthen dike and inundated a large lake at a closed power plant near Wilmington, North Carolina. The utility said it did not think any coal ash was at risk.
State-owned utility Santee Cooper in South Carolina is placing an inflatable dam around a coal ash pond near Conway, saying the extra 2.5 feet should be enough to keep floodwaters out. Officials warned human, hog and other animal waste were mixing in with floodwaters in the Carolinas.

Creeping Back to Normal

In Wilmington, things kept creeping back closer to normal in the state’s largest coastal city. Officials announced the end of a curfew and the resumption of regular trash pickup.

More than a thousand other roads from major highways to neighborhood lanes are closed in the Carolinas, officials said. Some of them have been washed out entirely.
But they said access to the city of 120,000 was still limited and asked people who evacuated to wait a few more days. They also warned people to not get caught off guard as rivers that briefly receded were periodically rising back.
The storm continues to severely hamper travel. Parts of the main north-south route on the East coast, Interstate 95, and the main road to Wilmington, Interstate 40, remain flooded and will likely be closed at least until nearly the end of September, North Carolina Department of Transportation Secretary Jim Trogdon said.
More than a thousand other roads from major highways to neighborhood lanes are closed in the Carolinas, officials said. Some of them have been washed out entirely.
The flood has been giving so much warning to Horry County, South Carolina, that officials published a detailed map of places that flooded in 2016 and warned those same places were going underwater again. One man had time to build a 6-foot-high dirt berm around his house.
The Waccamaw River has started its slow rise in the city of 23,000, and forecasters expect it to swell more than 3 feet above the previous record crest by Tuesday while still rising. Some areas could stay underwater for weeks, forecasters warned.

DON'T MISS

Protecting Domestic Wells a Key Piece of Southern Fresno County Groundwater Agency’s Planning

DON'T MISS

Vibrational Healing Through Bees: Is It Just a Lot of Buzz?

DON'T MISS

Hot, Inland California Cities Face the Steepest Water Cuts With New Conservation Mandate

DON'T MISS

How and Why to Get a State Seal of Biliteracy | Quick Guide

DON'T MISS

Young Republicans on Why Their Party Isn’t Reaching Gen Z (And What They Can Do About It)

DON'T MISS

JD Vance Puts the Con in Conservatism

DON'T MISS

UC Merced Finally Annexed Into City Limits After Two Decades

DON'T MISS

Donors Challenged Fresno Pacific to Match Their $1.5M Gift. Was the Goal Reached?

DON'T MISS

Garlic, Curry, Fresh Corn – Would You Scream for This Ice Cream?

DON'T MISS

Meet Po: A Gentle Superhero Looking for a Home

UP NEXT

911 Systems Disrupted in at Least 3 States

UP NEXT

Mourners Gather for Funeral of Man Slain at Trump Rally in Pennsylvania

UP NEXT

Widespread Technology Outage Disrupts Flights, Banks, Media Outlets and Companies Around the World

UP NEXT

Founder of Fandango Dies After Plunge From Manhattan Hotel

UP NEXT

Rally Shooter Had Photos of Trump, Biden and Other US Officials on His Phone, AP Sources Say

UP NEXT

The Last Cards Have Been Dealt as the Iconic Mirage Closes Its Doors on the Las Vegas Strip

UP NEXT

Visalia Man Faces Third Strike for Serial Burglary

UP NEXT

US Army Honors Nisei Combat Unit That Helped Liberate Tuscany From Nazi-Fascist Forces in WWII

UP NEXT

Majority of Americans, Including Republicans, Back Biden’s Supreme Court Term Limit Plan

UP NEXT

Fresno Police Arrest Suspect in 2023 Shooting Death

How and Why to Get a State Seal of Biliteracy | Quick Guide

1 hour ago

Young Republicans on Why Their Party Isn’t Reaching Gen Z (And What They Can Do About It)

18 hours ago

JD Vance Puts the Con in Conservatism

20 hours ago

UC Merced Finally Annexed Into City Limits After Two Decades

23 hours ago

Donors Challenged Fresno Pacific to Match Their $1.5M Gift. Was the Goal Reached?

1 day ago

Garlic, Curry, Fresh Corn – Would You Scream for This Ice Cream?

1 day ago

Meet Po: A Gentle Superhero Looking for a Home

1 day ago

Largest Housing Provider for Migrant Children Engaged in Pervasive Sexual Abuse, US Says

2 days ago

25 Million Watched Trump’s Speech at the RNC on Thursday

2 days ago

City Wants Hard Reset on Art Hop. Don’t Expect Food Trucks or Vendors in August.

2 days ago

Protecting Domestic Wells a Key Piece of Southern Fresno County Groundwater Agency’s Planning

A million-dollar program to keep residential wells flowing across a swath of southern Fresno and northern Kings counties is getting underway...

39 mins ago

39 mins ago

Protecting Domestic Wells a Key Piece of Southern Fresno County Groundwater Agency’s Planning

1 hour ago

Vibrational Healing Through Bees: Is It Just a Lot of Buzz?

1 hour ago

Hot, Inland California Cities Face the Steepest Water Cuts With New Conservation Mandate

Juan Garcia was one of 828 students in San Joaquin County to receive the State Seal of Biliteracy in 2023. Courtesy of San Joaquin County Office of Education
1 hour ago

How and Why to Get a State Seal of Biliteracy | Quick Guide

Photo of President Donald Trump
18 hours ago

Young Republicans on Why Their Party Isn’t Reaching Gen Z (And What They Can Do About It)

20 hours ago

JD Vance Puts the Con in Conservatism

23 hours ago

UC Merced Finally Annexed Into City Limits After Two Decades

1 day ago

Donors Challenged Fresno Pacific to Match Their $1.5M Gift. Was the Goal Reached?

MENU

CONNECT WITH US

Search

Send this to a friend