Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility
'Eviction Tsunami' Poised to Hit California in 3 Weeks
gvw_ap_news
By Associated Press
Published 4 years ago on
August 12, 2020

Share

SACRAMENTO — Eviction and foreclosure proceedings in California could resume Sept. 1, California’s chief justice announced Tuesday, putting pressure on the state Legislature to pass a law by the end of the month to prevent what many fear could be an “eviction tsunami” similar to the bursting of the housing bubble a decade ago.

The coronaivrus pandemic has prompted government-ordered shutdowns of most businesses, causing more than 9.7 million Californians to file for unemployment benefits since March and preventing many tenants from paying their rent.

Eviction and Foreclosure Proceedings Halted in April

The Judicial Council of California, the court system’s rule-making authority, voted to halt eviction and foreclosure proceedings on April 6 because of the pandemic. The rules were never meant to be a permanent solution, instead buying time for lawmakers to come up with relief for landlords and tenants.

Five months later, state lawmakers still have not agreed on how to handle the looming eviction crisis once the temporary rules end. The Judicial Council had been preparing to rescind the rules on Friday. But state lawmakers on the council, including Democratic Assemblyman Richard Bloom of Santa Monica, lobbied hard for another extension.

California Chief Justice Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye announced Tuesday the council would vote Thursday on whether to end the eviction protections Sept. 1 — one day after state lawmakers conclude their work for the year.

“There is nothing like a deadline to get people going,” Bloom said.

Over 5 Million Renters at Risk

California has about 17 million renters, and just over 5 million of them are at risk of eviction, according to an analysis by the Aspen Institute. Many of California’s local governments, including most of its large cities, have passed eviction protections that would extend beyond Sept. 1. But advocates worry some tenants could fall through the cracks without a statewide rule in place.

But that rule can’t come from the courts, Cantil-Sakauye said, because the job of the judicial branch is to interpret laws, not make them.

“I urge our sister branches to act expeditiously to resolve this looming crisis,” she said. “They have had since March 2020 to explore remedies that will provide fairness to all parties while recognizing the limitations the pandemic has placed on our residents and our institutions.”

Legislature Considering Several Bills to Extend Protections

The Democratic-controlled state Legislature is seriously considering two proposals. Both would halt evictions for nonpayment of rent because of the coronavirus. But they differ in how they would compensate landlords for missed rent. An Assembly proposal would protect property owners from foreclosure. A Senate proposal would offer property owners credits that would lower how much they owe in state taxes beginning in 2024. Owners could sell those credits before 2024 if they need cash immediately.

Both proposals face hurdles to reaching the governor’s desk, including opposition from property owners who have likened the Assembly proposal to free rent. Assemblyman David Chiu, author of the proposal, called the negotiations productive but said there are many details yet to be worked out.

“All policy makers understand how dire the situation is,” said Chiu, a Democrat from San Francisco. “We cannot allow a wave of mass evictions. It would be catastrophic for homelessness and COVID-19 spread and we have to act.”

The California Apartment Association opposes Chiu’s bill and is pushing for amendments to the Senate proposal. Debra Carlton, the association’s executive vice president for for state public affairs, said she was encouraged by the Judicial Council’s upcoming vote because it will give property owners “the ability to act when it comes to some of the disruptive tenants.”

“We certainly don’t want to see evictions for nonpayment of rent when a tenant has truly been affected by COVID,” she said.

RELATED TOPICS:

DON'T MISS

Cruisin’ Through Kingsburg’s 29th Annual Car Show

DON'T MISS

Fuzzy Little Adeline Will Purr You to Sleep

DON'T MISS

Boeing’s Financial Woes Continue, While Families of Crash Victims Urge US to Prosecute

DON'T MISS

Police Tangle With Students in Texas and California as Wave of Campus Protest Against Gaza War Grows

DON'T MISS

Meet the Valley Republican Predicting a November Win Over Esmeralda Soria

DON'T MISS

Wired Wednesday: Construction Workers on 2018 Fresno Unified Project Still Not Paid

DON'T MISS

Slumping California Risks Losing World’s ‘5th Largest Economy’ Title

DON'T MISS

Ukraine Uses Long-Range Missiles Secretly Provided by US to Hit Russian-Held Areas, Officials Say

DON'T MISS

Upward Bound: Edison High’s Garcia Headed to Johns Hopkins

DON'T MISS

Boxing Star Ryan Garcia Wants to Meet Netanyahu, Pledges Aid for Gaza Children

UP NEXT

Ancestry Website to Catalogue Names of Japanese Americans Incarcerated During World War II

UP NEXT

Sacramento Bee Accused of Mangling the Facts About Fish Caught in Pumps

UP NEXT

Google Fires More Workers Who Protested Its Deal With Israel

UP NEXT

CA Lawmakers Reject Bill Cracking Down on Utilities Spending Customers’ Money

UP NEXT

What Do Supreme Court Justices Say About Homelessness?

UP NEXT

Oprah Winfrey and Dwayne Johnson Pledged $10M for Maui Wildfire Survivors. They Gave Much More.

UP NEXT

Work Starts on Bullet Train Line From Las Vegas to LA

UP NEXT

Will CA Lawmakers Crack Down on Spending by Utility Companies?

UP NEXT

Los Angeles Mayor Karen Bass Safe After Suspect Breaks Into Official Residence, Police Say

UP NEXT

Newsom Wants to Make It Easier for Arizona Women to Get a California Abortion

Police Tangle With Students in Texas and California as Wave of Campus Protest Against Gaza War Grows

16 hours ago

Meet the Valley Republican Predicting a November Win Over Esmeralda Soria

16 hours ago

Wired Wednesday: Construction Workers on 2018 Fresno Unified Project Still Not Paid

16 hours ago

Slumping California Risks Losing World’s ‘5th Largest Economy’ Title

17 hours ago

Ukraine Uses Long-Range Missiles Secretly Provided by US to Hit Russian-Held Areas, Officials Say

18 hours ago

Upward Bound: Edison High’s Garcia Headed to Johns Hopkins

Local Education /

20 hours ago

Boxing Star Ryan Garcia Wants to Meet Netanyahu, Pledges Aid for Gaza Children

20 hours ago

Fong Won’t Debate Boudreaux, but We Get Hot Topic Answers Anyway

20 hours ago

Legislation Pandering to Tribal Casinos Is a Bad Bet for Fresno Cardroom Employees

21 hours ago

About 1 in 4 US Adults Over 50 Say They Expect to Never Retire, an AARP Study Finds

22 hours ago

Cruisin’ Through Kingsburg’s 29th Annual Car Show

Kingsburg — Hey there, hot rod fans! This past weekend, we turned the clock back and hit the streets for the 29th Annual Kingsburg Car Show ...

3 hours ago

3 hours ago

Cruisin’ Through Kingsburg’s 29th Annual Car Show

Animals /
3 hours ago

Fuzzy Little Adeline Will Purr You to Sleep

15 hours ago

Boeing’s Financial Woes Continue, While Families of Crash Victims Urge US to Prosecute

16 hours ago

Police Tangle With Students in Texas and California as Wave of Campus Protest Against Gaza War Grows

CA District 27 Assembly candidate Joanna Garcia Rose
16 hours ago

Meet the Valley Republican Predicting a November Win Over Esmeralda Soria

16 hours ago

Wired Wednesday: Construction Workers on 2018 Fresno Unified Project Still Not Paid

17 hours ago

Slumping California Risks Losing World’s ‘5th Largest Economy’ Title

18 hours ago

Ukraine Uses Long-Range Missiles Secretly Provided by US to Hit Russian-Held Areas, Officials Say

MENU

CONNECT WITH US

Search

Send this to a friend