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Second Death Linked to Panera’s Caffeinated Lemonade, New Lawsuit Claims

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Panera Bread faces a second lawsuit over its Charged Lemonade, blamed for the death of Dennis Brown, a 46-year-old Florida man with health issues. (Shutterstock)
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A second lawsuit has been filed against Panera Bread, alleging that the company’s highly caffeinated Charged Lemonade is responsible for another death. The suit claims that Dennis Brown, a 46-year-old man from Fleming Island, Florida, suffered a fatal cardiac arrest after consuming three of the beverages in October.

Brown, who had a chromosomal deficiency disorder, developmental delay, and mild intellectual disability, was a regular customer at Panera. Despite having high blood pressure, he did not consume energy drinks, according to the lawsuit.

This legal action comes less than two months after a separate lawsuit was filed against Panera, blaming the same beverage for the death of Sarah Katz, an Ivy League student with a heart condition. Both lawsuits argue that Panera failed to adequately warn consumers about the high caffeine content in its Charged Lemonade, which contains more caffeine than any size of Panera’s dark roast coffee and more than standard cans of Red Bull and Monster energy drinks combined.

The Food and Drug Administration states that healthy adults can safely consume up to 400 milligrams of caffeine per day. However, it remains unclear whether Brown was aware of the caffeine content in the Charged Lemonade.

Panera has expressed sympathy for Brown’s family but maintains that its products are safe and that Brown’s death was not caused by its beverage. Following the first lawsuit, the company added more detailed warnings about the Charged Lemonade in its restaurants and on its website.

Brown’s family filed the lawsuit to raise awareness about the potential dangers of the drink, according to their attorney, Elizabeth Crawford.

Read more at NBC News.

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