Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility
NCAA Urges Gov. Newsom Not to Sign ‘Fair Pay’ Bill
gvw_ap_news
By Associated Press
Published 5 years ago on
September 11, 2019

Share

INDIANAPOLIS — The NCAA Board of Governors wants Gov. Gavin Newsom to reject a new attempt to pay college athletes.

“We’ve explored how it might impact the association and what it might do. We believe it would inappropriately affect interstate commerce. It is not intended to be a threat at all. It’s a reflection about the way California is going about this.” Donald Remy, the NCAA’s chief operating officer and chief legal officer
And it is prepared to take the fight to court if necessary.
In a six-paragraph letter released Wednesday, the board urged Newsom not to sign the legislation known as the Fair Pay to Play Act, which would allow college athletes to be paid for the use of their names, likenesses and images. The move comes two days after approval of the measure by the California Assembly, with the state Senate expected to consider the measure later this week.
The board warned that California schools may be declared ineligible for NCAA competition if the bill becomes law because they would have an unfair recruiting advantage.
“We’ve explored how it might impact the association and what it might do. We believe it would inappropriately affect interstate commerce,” Donald Remy, the NCAA’s chief operating officer and chief legal officer, told The Associated Press. “It is not intended to be a threat at all. It’s a reflection about the way California is going about this.
“I’m not saying there will never be a day we would consider that (legal action), but it is not meant to be a threat,” Remy said.
The board is especially concerned because the bill puts no restrictions on how much athletes could make. The NCAA said the measure would impact more than 24,000 athletes in the nation’s most populous state.
Should the bill pass, Newsom would have 30 days to sign or veto it. If he does nothing, the bill would become law. It would be the first measure of its kind and the outcome is being closely watched as one of the biggest challenges in years to the NCAA’s longstanding and far-reaching model of amateur sports. Over the past decade, that model has come under increasing pressure — and attacks in court — as critics push for big-time college athletics to clear the way for the athletes themselves to benefit financially.

Appetite for Change

NCAA rules prohibit athletes from profiting off their athletic skills. The organization, however, has recently begun considering rules changes to loosen those restrictions, though NCAA President Mark Emmert — and the board again on Wednesday — insist that players cannot be paid or become the equivalent of a university employee. Formal recommendations are expected to be made at the board’s October meeting.

“So we are and have been taking a very close look at how we can modernize those rules. We’re hoping the state of California would recognize that modernizing those rules for student-athletes across the country is the best way to do that.” — Denis McDonough, an NCAA board member and the White House chief of staff under President Barack Obama
It appears there is an appetite for significant changes.
“The rules that we operate under, many of which date to 1975, may not be suitable for us in 2021 with the challenges and opportunities student-athletes face,” said Denis McDonough, an NCAA board member and the White House chief of staff under President Barack Obama. “So we are and have been taking a very close look at how we can modernize those rules. We’re hoping the state of California would recognize that modernizing those rules for student-athletes across the country is the best way to do that.”
Board members met with the working group studying these issues in August but neither McDonough nor Remy would discuss specific proposals.
The NCAA believes the California measure would violate the federal Commerce Clause and may not withstand a legal challenge; Remy cited a previous case in California in which the state tried to inhibit the NCAA from enforcing its rules. The NCAA won that case.
Should the measure pass, Remy said, the NCAA would penalize the schools, not individual athletes.
“There are two parts to this and part of this is the membership and that includes the California schools,” Remy said. “Schools and universities agree to comply with the rules of (NCAA) membership and there are a set of eligibility criteria that go along with being member institution. The California schools have consented to that criterion. So in that context it would be the schools that would directly impacted.”

DON'T MISS

Lauryn Hill, Tyla and More Will Perform at the 2024 BET Awards. Here’s What to Know About the Show

DON'T MISS

From Globe Trotting to Globe Tripping: Why Psychedelic Vacations Are on Trend

DON'T MISS

Find Out Which Lobbying Groups Get Their Way Most Often in the California Legislature

DON'T MISS

Here’s Why Ukraine Should Seek Peace

DON'T MISS

Fresno County Gets National Recognition for Poverello House Project

DON'T MISS

You Don’t Think Corn Dogs Are Haute Cuisine? These Chefs, Using Alligator Sausage, Beg to Differ.

DON'T MISS

Investigators Have Name & Face for Suspected Arsonist Who Left Notes at Fresno Homes

DON'T MISS

Gavin Newsom and Top Democrats Are Deciding California’s Budget Behind Closed Doors

DON'T MISS

Fresno State Is 1 of Carnegie Foundation’s 25 Leadership for Public Purpose Colleges

DON'T MISS

As the Flag Drops at Le Mans, Remembering the 3 Americans Who Won in 1978

UP NEXT

As the Flag Drops at Le Mans, Remembering the 3 Americans Who Won in 1978

UP NEXT

QB Trevor Lawrence and the Jaguars Agree to a 5-Year, $275M Contract Extension

UP NEXT

Scottie Scheffler Opens U.S. Open With 71, Leaving Him in Contention but With Ground to Make Up

UP NEXT

Conor McGregor out of UFC 303 Because of an Undisclosed Injury

UP NEXT

Lorenzen Pitches Rangers Past Dodgers for 1st Series Win in LA Since 1999

UP NEXT

IndyCar Ditches NBC for Fox Sports, Which Now Has Daytona 500 & Indy 500

UP NEXT

Doncic Fouls out and Mavericks Fall Into 3-0 Hole in NBA Finals

UP NEXT

Cowboys WR & Fresno State Alum Jalen Moreno-Cropper Hosts Youth Football Camp

UP NEXT

Corey Seager Returns to Dodger Stadium, Cracks 3-Run HR in Texas Win

UP NEXT

Slater, Webb, and Bullpen Shine as the Giants Beat the Astros

Here’s Why Ukraine Should Seek Peace

8 hours ago

Fresno County Gets National Recognition for Poverello House Project

8 hours ago

You Don’t Think Corn Dogs Are Haute Cuisine? These Chefs, Using Alligator Sausage, Beg to Differ.

8 hours ago

Investigators Have Name & Face for Suspected Arsonist Who Left Notes at Fresno Homes

20 hours ago

Gavin Newsom and Top Democrats Are Deciding California’s Budget Behind Closed Doors

22 hours ago

Fresno State Is 1 of Carnegie Foundation’s 25 Leadership for Public Purpose Colleges

22 hours ago

As the Flag Drops at Le Mans, Remembering the 3 Americans Who Won in 1978

22 hours ago

Paw-sitively Spikey: The Rise of a Supermutt!

1 day ago

Supreme Court Deals Blow to Environmental Law Relied on by Housing Opponents

1 day ago

The Latest | Hezbollah Says Its Intensified Attacks Show Israel That All-out War Would Be Costly

1 day ago

Lauryn Hill, Tyla and More Will Perform at the 2024 BET Awards. Here’s What to Know About the Show

NEW YORK — The 2024 BET Awards are fast approaching. Last year’s show celebrated 50 years of hip-hop with tributes to the genre’s earl...

6 hours ago

6 hours ago

Lauryn Hill, Tyla and More Will Perform at the 2024 BET Awards. Here’s What to Know About the Show

8 hours ago

From Globe Trotting to Globe Tripping: Why Psychedelic Vacations Are on Trend

8 hours ago

Find Out Which Lobbying Groups Get Their Way Most Often in the California Legislature

8 hours ago

Here’s Why Ukraine Should Seek Peace

8 hours ago

Fresno County Gets National Recognition for Poverello House Project

8 hours ago

You Don’t Think Corn Dogs Are Haute Cuisine? These Chefs, Using Alligator Sausage, Beg to Differ.

20 hours ago

Investigators Have Name & Face for Suspected Arsonist Who Left Notes at Fresno Homes

22 hours ago

Gavin Newsom and Top Democrats Are Deciding California’s Budget Behind Closed Doors

MENU

CONNECT WITH US

Search

Send this to a friend