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How Conservatives Are Trying to Win the Culture Wars in Huntington Beach

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The Huntington Beach City Council's decision to drop ethnic heritage events such as Black History Month is being called "whitewashed revisionist history." (GV Wire Composite/David Rodriguez)
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The Huntington Beach City Council has decided to discontinue its recognition of various ethnic heritage celebrations, including Black History Month and Women’s History Month.

The new plan involves the establishment of a panel to create a 12-month history program for the city. Some potential themes include “the Revolutionary and Civil War” month and “Black Gold Jubilee – Honoring the Discovery of Oil” month.

The council’s decision has sparked local outrage, as it is not the first time the council’s Republican majority has taken actions that have been perceived as undermining local diversity. Earlier this year, the council majority banned the flying of the LGBTQ+ Pride Flag and other flags on government property and disbanded the city’s Human Relations committee.

The council plans to replace these celebrations with a new schedule that some critics have labeled as a “whitewashed revisionist history.” The council’s decision is based on the belief that these celebrations should be devoid of identity politics.

Councilman Casey McKeon defended the decision, stating that the council aims to focus on 12 themes a year to help city staff align their efforts. However, the move has been met with criticism, with state Sen. Dave Min calling it “embarrassing and shameful.”

The council’s Republicans supported the changes, while the Democratic minority opposed them. The new plan involves the establishment of a panel to create a 12-month history program for the city. Some potential themes include “the Revolutionary and Civil War” month and “Black Gold Jubilee – Honoring the Discovery of Oil” month.

The council’s minority questioned the need to discard the existing celebrations. Councilman Dan Kalmick criticized the proposal, stating that it had nothing to do with public policy and would effectively eliminate many celebrations aimed at minorities.

Read more at Voice of OC.

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