SHARE THIS ARTICLE:

Audiences who hit play on Joshua Rofé’s new documentary miniseries Sasquatch in the expectation that someone’s finally gotten some straight answers about that elusive hirsute bastard will be sorely disappointed. “I wasn’t hung up on whether I believe in Bigfoot or whether I buy the details of this story. All of that became secondary and fell by the wayside,” Rofé tells the Guardian via Zoom. “I was struck by the visceral fear present in all these encounter stories. I was taken by how afraid these people were, which was totally authentic.”His three-part project takes the myth of the shy giant allegedly hiding in the wilds of the west coast as a jumping-off point, leaving behind the cryptozoological to pursue something more tangible and knowable. What begins as an inspection of Bigfoot as a sociological phenomenon leads Rofé and his partner-in-true-crime, journalist David Holthouse, to a 1993 triple homicide said by locals to be the handiwork of the infamous ape-creature. But there’s a far darker truth buried deep beneath the legend, pertaining instead to a mammal capable of greater violence than any other in the animal kingdom. “Some monsters are real,” warns the production’s tagline; naturally, it’s referring to homo sapiens.

Read More →

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

We've got issues, and we're willing to share
(but only if you want them in your inbox).